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Art and memory

Event 

Title:
Art and memory: Jordi Mitjà
When:
05.04.2011 - 10.07.2011
Category:
Art i memòria històric

Description

Jordi Mitjà, F for Frontier, 2007. 34’, colour + sound

 

Video made in Ixmiquilpan (Mexico, Hidalgo), where the Hñahñú indigenous community organises and carries out a fake nocturnal border crossing as a form of survival. A performance which serves as a tourist attraction with the aim of promoting the natural park that they manage and preventing, as far as possible, immigration to the United States. This “fake” takes place thousands of kilometres from the real border and, for some years, has been a tourist magnet in the area.

 

Jordi Mitjà (Figueres, 1970). His work, formally heterogeneous, replete with content and social criticism, sensitive and poetic and of a conceptual nature, finds its sources in images of everyday life that the artist continuously records. He collects experiences and images, invents situations, explores archives, and proposes actions with the aim of examining the simplest human reactions to unpredictable contexts. He extracts and formulates new creations based on reality, either through a filmic approach or by creating publications or objects. His proposals raise questions about the individual, social conducts and art.

 

 

This work of Jordi Mitjà will be shown in Art and Memory section, located in the hall of MUME, April 5  to july 10, 2011.

 

Art and Memory. Contemporary Artistic Initiatives

 This space – which has occasional contributions from the Maçart group – is devoted to the periodical exhibition of contemporary artistic initiatives based on the relations between art and memory – individual and collective – associated with historical and political events. In this respect, priority is given to those works that, based on a documentary, emotional and reflective perspective, consider the function and influence that memory and the figure of the witness can have both in understanding 20th century history and in a possible critical approach to the complexity of today’s world.